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Get in formation

08.03.21

GET IN FORMATION

We woke up this morning with rain pouring down on the crew house. Subtle glances and a nod with our skipper Dundee confirmed we were still going ahead despite the wet weather. The wind and swell were low so we knew it would be a good day still. With each hour passing the clouds dispersed. By the end of the day we had a few beams of sunshine soaking into the deep blue and drying us from the morning. 

Today was all about formation. We had four distinct different formations with four different pods taking part. 

This morning we were with two pods of Orca moving parallel to each other, the large Bull Goku and an unknown female had dropped behind and were ensuring no orca got left behind. The rain subsided and we managed to avoid any further squalls. The slow and relaxed nature suggested resting – the only jumping we observed was by skipjack tuna who would catch our eye as their silvery bodies caught the light. 

After a couple hours of this the pods spun 180 degrees and went their seperate ways. Intermittent sightings with long down times so we hung back watching it all play out. 

The pods formed up again but this time the calves were set loose! The four of them from Nani, Goku and Wonks pod ranged between one and five years old. They would charge through past us and push each other to the surface. Little flicks of the tail showed their playful side and an extra high surface meant their eyes were above the water checking us out. They would approach slowly from beneath us, eye-balling us the whole time… when they couldn’t hold their breath any longer they would spray us and then take off back to human-less deep water. 

As the adults surfaced after four minutes the calves would go back to their respective mothers, check in for thirty seconds or so and then race back to hang out with each other again! A large female came in to see what the commotion was about and BOOM she flicked her tail heavily and left a huge footprint! What was that about?!

Next minute she was on our bow surging… as were the twenty or so other orca in the area. 

To take it up to the next level, this was our last formation. SURGING! Orca a mile either side of us had there sights on something in front of us! We surged with them for over four nautical miles! Split Tip was riding our wake, creating that distinctive V shape over her rostrum (head). They slowed and by this point it was time for us to head to the dunes (home). 

 

Adventure filled day with an amazing group of passengers! Liz, a 78 and a half year old passengers informed us this was one of the best things she has ever done…… we are so proud to have made this list!! See you next year Liz 🙂

By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter
By Naturaliste Charter

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