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Calm after the storm

08.02.2022 

 

Today came off the back of a double day cancellation! Due to two major weather systems that were coming from opposing directions the ocean was fierce!!!  

Today however, our ocean had taken a deep breath and calmed. The conflicting seas had arm-wrestled til the point that the south-wester won.  

The swell moved in from a south westerly direction and it was big! A forecast of three-metres felt pretty accurate. With little to no wind which felt like sweet relief. It was as if we were driving through a hilly country-side letting each set roll past under us.  

On arrival El Notcho and his family pod were all present and accounted for. They travelled south west for the most part of the morning, then double backed on us! Since the water was so calm their blows were very faint, only an experienced eagle eye could have spotted them.  

We then moved back north-east along the same line with the pod and were so grateful to be witnessing orca in their natural habitat. Their lethargic nature was enticing us to look further into the canyon system to see these apex predators at work. 

Soon after, we found our second pod for the day. Noosa, Split Tip, Wonks, plus the rest of the maternal group were venturing into deeper water. The maximum depth we passed over today was 2500m in the Hood canyon.  

Four mothers kept their calves in an echelon swimming motion while multiple Wandering Albatross’s soared high above us.  

Nothing compares to the span of a wanderers wings. When you have been looking at Mutton birds all day and an albatross glides in, you HAVE to take a second glance. The wanderers, or flying ocean goose as I like to call them, are distinguised from the white markings across their body and back.  

The orca navigated the big swell, moving as slow as the sets rolled through. What a relief to have, what I would consider, to be a fairly calm day in the canyon. The sun was beaming down on us and letting the deep southern ocean glow gatorade blue. 

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